A history of the great london plague in 1665

The Great Plague of was the last major plague in England. Before the Great Plague, England had had outbreaks of plague meaning many people got the disease every few decades.

A history of the great london plague in 1665

C N Trueman "The Plague of " historylearningsite.

The plague was only finally brought under control in when the Great Fire of London burned down the areas most affected by plague – the city slums inhabited by the poor. Stuart England was never free from the plague but saw the worst. had experienced a very hot summer. Apr 01,  · The Great Plague of killed , Londoners – one in three of the people living in the city. Feb 07,  · Documentary examining the Great Plague of , one of the darkest moments in Britain's history, when over one-fifth of London's population of , perished in a matter of months.

The History Learning Site, 17 Mar Plague had been around in England for centuries but in the so-called Great Plague hit the country — though it was Stuart London that took the worst of the plague. The plague was only finally brought under control in when the Great Fire of London burned down the areas most affected by plague — the city slums inhabited by the poor.

Stuart England was never free from the plague but saw the worst. The only way people had to get rid of rubbish was to throw it out into the streets. This would include normal household waste as well as human waste.

As a result, London was filthy. But this was a perfect breeding place for rats. A popular belief during the plague was that the disease was caused by dogs and cats. This was not so.

The plague was caused by disease-carrying fleas carried on the bodies of rats. A pair of rats in the perfect environment could breed many off-spring.

Great Plague of - The National Archives

The filth found in the streets of London provided the perfect environment for rats. Not surprisingly, the first victims of the plague were found in the poorer districts of the city. The cramped living conditions these people lived in, and the fact that so many actually lived in the slum areas of London, meant that many people could not avoid contact with either the rats or someone who had the disease.

What were the symptoms of the plague? This is best summed up in a popular nursery rhyme of the time: These could also develop into large pus filled sacs found primarily under the armpits and in the groin.

These buboes were very painful to the sufferer.

A history of the great london plague in 1665

The second line refers to the belief that the plague was spread by a cloud of poisonous gas that was colourless known as a miasma. This miasma could only be stopped, so it was believed, if you carried flowers with you as the smell of the flowers would overpower the germs carried by the miasma.

The flowers perfume would have covered up this unpleasantness. The final symptom was a sneezing fit that was promptly followed by death. Some of the victims did not get as far as this stage presumably as their lives were so poor that their bodies were even less able to cope with the disease. For some, a swift death was merciful.

Once the disease took a hold it spread with frightening speed.

Those who could, the wealthy, left London for the comparative safety of the countryside. No such option existed for those who lived in the slums. Very few of these certificates were issued.

Great Plague of London | epidemic, London, England, United Kingdom [–] | iridis-photo-restoration.com

The poor were very badly hit by the plague. The authorities in London decided on drastic action to ensure that the plague did not spread.

Any family that had one member infected by the plague was locked in their home for forty days and nights. A red cross was painted on the door to warn others of the plight of those in the house.Plague had been around in England for centuries but in it was Stuart London that suffered.

This was the worst outbreak of plague in England since the black death of The plague was only finally brought under control in when the Great Fire of London burned down the areas most affected by plague – the city slums inhabited by the poor.

Stuart England was never free from the plague but saw the worst. had experienced a very hot summer. But from the time of the “Black Death” () the country experienced no such suffering from any epidemic as that which fell upon London in That year the “Great Plague” is said to have destroyed the lives of nearly one hundred thousand people in England’s capital.

Great Plague of London, epidemic of plague that ravaged London, England, from to City records indicate that some 68, people died during the epidemic, though the actual number of deaths is suspected to have exceeded , out of a total population estimated at , In , the bubonic plague made its final true appearance in London.

The outbreak, known as the Great Plague claimed between 75, and , lives, most of them belonging to poor, working.

DNA testing has for the first time confirmed the identity of the bacteria behind London's Great Plague. The plague of was the last major outbreak of bubonic plague in Britain, killing.

The London Plague